How can I help collars fold correctly?

  • Angel Angel Comment actions Permalink

    Check you don't have any pressure set on one side of the pattern piece and that the collision offset distance is 1.5mm at human scale avatar size (1.63cm tall avatar).

     

    Failing that ensure the fabric is not a stiff preset > and that solidify is off. Ensure the internal line for the  bend fold angle has a strength setting that keeps the fold down. You can check that using the bend angle tool. Do those checks and let me know how you get on.

  • Tim Smith Comment actions Permalink

    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll be sure to give those a try and check sometime in the day. I didn't even know you could set a strength for the fold. :)

  • Tim Smith Comment actions Permalink

    The collision offset - is that the Add'l Thickness - Collision (mm)...? That's the only collision setting I can see. I've currently got the fabric set to Cotton_14_Wale_Corduroy. I'm working on a Western styled cotton shirt. I've tried adjusting the curvature of the fold on the collar so it's more inline with the flow of the placket, but I'm not sure if it's a good idea. The fold angle has helped to keep it down at the back, although I'm trying to get it a bit thicker and closer to the neck, along with the plackets. They're currently too loose/slack. Although, if I try to reduce their size, it ends up pulling up the shirt at the bottom. :-\

  • Angel Angel Comment actions Permalink

    Your ref: > The collision offset - is that the Add'l Thickness - Collision (mm)...? 

    Yes that's correct.

    To pull the collar together at the top button position use the tack (garment) tool > and tack from the left to right top button position and then adjust the thread leangth such that it suits the openness you want for the collar. This will allow you to pull the collar tighter, yet the thread remain invisible in the assembly.

     

    You may need to check your pattern size for that avatar as the garment looks a little small across the back and tight in areas, this may be causing some fit issues. Do the tack suggestion I made and then switch the 3D view to the strain/stress mesh view to see if there are many red areas (tight/strain) if there are you can quickly make a pattern adjustment numerically (without changing the 2D drafting) by selecting all pattern pieces for the shirt and in the property editor raising the warp + weft percentage ratio from 100% to something like 103% for all patterns in both warp/weft factors > this is the same as adjusting your 2D patterns up in scale by 3%. In this manner you can test the simulation for fit again and if it fits better across the back and front around the neck you could then change the pattern (s) scale  back to 100% for warp/weft and make 2D pattern drafting edits to reflect the required percentage size increase for patterns . For example you might want to increase the overall pattern girth for shirt assembly but want to test it 1st without making time consuming 2D pattern edits manually, so you adjust warp/weft % ratio's  up > retest the simulated fit > decide on what new girth works best > then make 2D pattern edits on pattern width (warp) to reflect that girth change but leave length as it was. So in this manner a quick numerical tweak  can let you try out some assembly fits in a couple of clicks.

  • Tim Smith Comment actions Permalink

    To pull the collar together at the top button position use the tack (garment) tool > and tack from the left to right top button position and then adjust the thread leangth such that it suits the openness you want for the collar. This will allow you to pull the collar tighter, yet the thread remain invisible in the assembly.

    Cool. Though for this character, the top of the shirt is open and loose, so the collar isn't fully fastened. However, it's great to know it can be tightened with a tack. I'll give it a try. :)

    For the Warp and Weft settings, which ones would they be? There's quite a few, such as Stretch, Bending and Buckling etc. Also, I can't push them above 100%.

  • Angel Angel Comment actions Permalink

    You can also tack the garment to the avatar for some control.

     

    Select the pattern piece itself > then navigate to the property editor and warp/weft % is listed in the values for the pattern piece. It's not related to the physical fabric preset that is for fabrics and this is related to the pattern piece scale (weft = pattern width or x / warp = pattern length or y ).

     

    What you are doing is changing the numerical scale of the 2D drafted pattern > which allows you to enlarge it without changing the drafted pattern size in the 2D window. If the garment patterns (you should select all the patterns that form the shirt, so window select them all) fit better you have made a scale adjustment for that assembled item, with having to redraft or alter the 2D.

     

    This is called > shrinkage in the trade, and is typically used for real world patterns when you engineer a garment > then dye it and shrink the fabric under heat of washing or processing. The drafting is done at a specific size and then the contraction from the processing needs to be factored in . eg: jeans.  MD uses the same drafting tools used in CLO3D for digital garment design. However you can also use it to enlarge patterns to test for different manufacturing conditions > in CG this can also be used to fit one size garment (eg: size 10 ) to another size avatar (eg: size 12) as opposed to using the auto-fit tool.

  • Tim Smith Comment actions Permalink

    Ahhh, I see. Gotcha. This is how it's looking currently:

    There's a few areas in the red at the moment. Only recently started working on the trousers... Been battling getting the shirt to tuck into them too. Would using a tack to avatar be a good idea for that? I've been using a combination of layers and pins so far.

  • Tim Smith Comment actions Permalink

    Hmm. I'm not sure about the suggestion you made regarding the Shrinkage Weft and Warp. I'm adjusting various parts of the trousers at a small percentage to reduce the red areas, but it's doing very little. :-\ Especially the waist area. They look like they fit just fine, despite being in the red, and I don't want them to end up being loose when I want to keep the shirt tucked in. But should I be aiming for it all to be in the green and blue...?

  • Angel Angel Comment actions Permalink

    No there are definitely problems on fit you need to address, this is where a fitters eye for problems differs form a laypersons whom might not deal with fashion directly.

     

    You can see form your strain/stress image that there are definitely pattern problems for fit.

     

    The pants are pulling across the top of the thigh into the rear (crotch saddle) which means your pattern shape is maybe at fault here in terms of 'crotch and bum' fit.However with historic patterns they tended to fit poorly in some designs so that can be a subjective call.

     

    The shirt is definitely wrong across the back, (across shoulder dimensions)  as it is far too tight which is also causing strain around the underarm, so that is maybe 20% out of whack in terms of size & shape. The sleeve girth in general looks too tight on the upper arm.

     

    Because the arm (shoulder + underarm) are consistently in the red (120%) which means +20% strain that indicates immediately that the upper arm hole girth is too small on your garment, and it is also too small across the back. This means if the model were animated or the pose changed there would likely be awkward stretching of the texels or strange creasing (stress on the bias) in those areas if realtime simulated. So already you are going to have problems if you don't address that. And in terms of construction and drafting changes this means you need to increase the upper sleeve girth, enlarge the arm hole, drop the lower arm hole point, and increase the rear shoulder (across back) dimension. That's just for starters .... then there is the pants problem ... with weird bunching on the bum cheeks ? Is that intended from a historical sense or is it pattern shaping error - you need to decide by looking at period garments to see if that is how they fitted, if not adjust.   

     

    Often a poor fit can be about the pattern shape, causing it to pull in the wrong places, and in this instance I would say you have two errors, subtle pattern shape that needs to improve and an increase in ease (adding in fabric) to get less strain on the garments for that pose and character avatar shape.

     

  • Tim Smith Comment actions Permalink

    Hmm. Well, I guess, in terms of the style and fitting I'm after, I'm trying to base it on Arthur Morgan's from Red Dead Redemption 2, so it's an 1899 Western style. This is a model of him I found online, along with the shirt and trousers:

  • Tim Smith Comment actions Permalink

    Okay, I ended up re-doing the trousers by using the Line (Avatar) tool, which made a more natural and snug fit to the avatar. Also, I've been making sure that areas I stitch to always show up with blue measurements instead of red, to make sure things are even and neater. The stress indicators are much better now. :) The only area I'm having problems with getting right are the crotch area.

  • Angel Angel Comment actions Permalink

    Much better the crotch on the trousers is most probably ok now.

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